Psalm 23

Come, The Banquet is Ready

lightstock_370168_small_byrene_haney

You prepare a table before me (Ps 23:5)

The psalmist, David shifts his attention for protection from the valley of death in verse 4 to the new metaphor in verse 5, God as the bounteous host. The psalmist paints this beautiful picture of a generous table at which God can defy all his enemies.

For, one to eat at the host’s table means the guest is under His protection. In, those days the news of man’s wealth is spread through his dinner parties. The more lavish his hospitality, the more his fame spread.  Today the standards of success are determined by the number of fancy cars one possesses or how lavish is the mansion on the hill manned with menservants and maidservants a person owns.  However, in traditional Middle Eastern culture, when you want the community to know you have made it in the world and that you are a person of wealth, successful people would host meals with three times as much food on the table as the multitudes of guests can eat.

The Table Set Out by Our King

Keep that thought entrenched in your mind and now read the words of Isaiah the prophet in chapter 25:6-8.

On this mountain, the Lord of hosts will make for all peoples

a feast of rich food, a feast of well-aged wine,

of rich food full of marrow, of aged wine well refined.

And he will swallow up on this mountain

the covering that is cast over all peoples,

the veil that is spread over all nations.

He will swallow up death forever;

and the Lord God will wipe away tears from all faces,

and the reproach of his people he will take away from all the earth,

for the Lord has spoken.

 

Our God, Yahweh, watches as the nations’ make their journey to the mountain of the Lord. On this mountain, Yahweh has prepared a feast to show His enemies His power and majesty.

They shall not hurt or destroy

in all my holy mountain;

for the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord as the waters cover the sea.  Isaiah 11:9

  Yahweh will establish His kingship on His mountain. God lays out a banquet in the presence of His enemy Satan.  Moreover, by the abundance and the quality of the feast, God displays His superiority.  Through this lavish spread, Yahweh declares victory over Satan, sin, and death.  Often, death or the powers of the evil one’s underworld are pictured as the swallower of life.
Therefore, Sheol has enlarged its appetite and opened its mouth beyond measure, and the nobility of Jerusalem and her multitude will go down,  her revelers and he who exults in her.  Isaiah 5:14

Yahweh snatches victory from the mouth of death and replaces it with everlasting life. Typical food only prolongs our existence; at the feast, God lays out before the nations, even death is conquered. God will swallow up death forever, and the Lord will wipe away the tears from all nations.  Heaven is the banquet, the war is over, the victory one.  Come and dine all is ready. The funeral will turn into a wedding!  Sorry has turned to joy. Tears have been replaced with laughter.  All because the Good Shepherd, Jesus Christ has laid down His life for the sheep.  Faith in this Shepherd is the only ticket we need to attend this beautifully prepared feast.  Come now all is ready.

Advertisements
Psalm 23

Two Ways God Uses The Shepherd’s Rod

lightstock_270962_small_byrene_haney

Your rod and your staff, they comfort me.

 

The Hebrew word here translated “rod” has a long history. Its meanings include rod, scepter, and weapon. It does not refer to a “walking stick” as we often see this depicted in drawings. The rod is the shepherd’s primary offensive weapon for protecting the flock from enemies, whether the threats are wild animals or human thieves. A shepherd’s rod is about two and a half feet long with a mace-like end that the shepherd embeds heavy pieces of iron. When used as a weapon it becomes intimidating and deadly.

The rod and staff mentioned in Psalm 23, verse 4 represents God’s defense and His divine guidance. His rod is used to drive off our enemy, Satan and his minions. God’s staff is used as guidance to the flock and to lift them back on the pathway when they fell.

People like sheep are stubborn.  We must be directed back.  Often, we don’t return until we have exhausted every other option.  The illustration below will shed light on that bit of truth.

Dr. Andrew Bonar told me how, in the Highlands of Scotland, a sheep would often wander off into the rocks and get into places they couldn’t get out of. The grass on these mountains is very sweet, and the sheep like it, and they will jump down ten or twelve feet, and then they can’t jump back again, and the shepherd hears them bleating in distress. They may be there for days until they have eaten all the grass. The shepherd will wait until they are so faint they cannot stand, and then they will put a rope around him, and he will pull that sheep up out of the jaws of death. “Why don’t they go down there when the sheep first gets there?” I asked. “Ah!” He said, “they are so very foolish they would dash right over the precipice and be killed if they did!” And that is the way with men; they won’t go back to God till they have no friends and have lost everything. If you are a wanderer, I tell you that the Good Shepherd will bring you back the moment you have given up trying to save yourself and are willing to let Him save you His own way. – Moody’s Anecdotes, pp. 70-71.

The various uses for this rod mentioned in the Bible include:

  1. To count sheep.

And every tithe of herds and flocks, every tenth animal of all that pass under the herdsman’s staff, shall be holy to the Lord. Lev. 27:32

Going Deeper. Tithing is misunderstood. For the ancient Israelites, there were three tithes: 1) the general tithe (Lev 27), 2) the tithe of the sacred meal with the Levite (Deut. 14:22–27), and (3) the tithe paid every three years to the poor (Deut. 14:28–29).  In Leviticus, Moses addresses the general tithe. The method the shepherd used to calculate his portion is counting every tenth animal that passed under the shepherd’s rod (27:32).

As the shepherd returns to the sheepfold in the evening, he holds his rod horizontally across the entrance just high enough for the sheep to pass under it one at a time. That way he can track the sheep.  If a sheep is missing, the shepherd will immediately begin searching.

In the sheepfold of God, He uses the shepherd’s rod as an alarm system to assure the safety of the flock.  If any sheep is lost, Jesus the Good Shepherd will overturn heaven and earth until the lost lamb is found.

  1. To protect the sheep from wild animals and thieves.

Lorrie Anderson, missionary to the head-shrinking Candoshi Shapra Indians of Peru, was looking for a quiet place for her daily time of Bible reading and prayer, so she went down to the edge of the river. After reading the Bible, she took up her prayer list. Eyes closed, she did not see the deadly anaconda weaving through the water until it struck, burying its fangs into her flesh. It withdrew to strike, hitting her arm again and again as it held her, screaming, in its coils. It reared up for the death blows. Then suddenly the giant snake, never known to release its prey, relaxed its grip and slithered off through the water. While Lorrie was being treated, a witch doctor from a nearby village burst into the hut and stared at her. She couldn’t believe Lorrie had survived. She said her son-in-law, also a witch doctor, had chanted to the spirit of the anaconda that morning and sent it to kill the young missionary. “I’m certain,” Lorrie said, “that except for the protection of God, it would have worked.” – Daily Bread, August 13, 1990.

The psalmist can meditate on the shepherd’s rod and say to himself, “I am safe from any threat and all harm. My confidence is my shepherd.  He is skilled, armed with his rod and I know he is skilled in using it.  The shepherd’s staff and his love for me are all I need for protection.”

Psalm 23

How To Navigate Fear of Valley of Death?

Cross shaped key
A woman carries a cross shaped key to gates of heaven

 Shepherds in the region of Lebanon alone knew which of the many paths would lead the sheep safely out of the valley. Taking a wrong path could lead to peril, like a dead end where the sheep would become trapped and frightened or possibly off the edge of a cliff.

 Now would be a good point to clear up a common misunderstanding about righteousness.  Martin Luther once said of righteousness. “He who would gain righteousness by faith and works is as the dog who runs along a stream with a piece of meat in his mouth, and, deceived by the reflection of the meat in the water, opens his mouth to snap at it, and so loses both the meat and the reflection” (Martin Luther, Treatise on Christian Liberty) [1]

 The proper understanding of righteousness is that Jesus invites us to imitate the “righteousness of God” who, out of Jesus’ righteousness, acts in history to save humanity. Jesus then says to us follow my example.  Use Jesus’ righteousness as a model for our righteousness.  Examine His life as the good shepherd with a trustworthy reputation. As one who acts out of his own integrity.  A Savior who will not violate his core values and purpose even when tempted by Satan to give up that goal to save Himself.  It would have been easy to say these people are not worthy, but not Jesus’s will but God’s divine purpose be done.

 Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,

Charles Schultz, the creator of the comic strip “Peanuts,” pictures one of his characters, Linus, tenaciously clinging to his security blanket. Wherever he goes or whatever he does, Linus must have his blanket. He feels insecure without it. This quote may be humorous, but actually, all of us have to have our security blankets of one kind or another. [2]

This section of Psalm 23 always gave me a reason to pause and just sit here in the valley for a moment, particularly in the head of a casket.  The Valleys of the shadow of death being referenced here are paths which wind in between mountains where there are dark shadows and deep gorges. Travelers march carefully, slowly and silently through this valley wondering if this may be their last trip.  Will some form of evil befall them here?  It was a known hideout for bandits.

The fear of death was very real.  And because it was possible that at some point during this long slow walk death was constantly on their minds. What would you do at that moment?  Sing hymns to comfort your troubled soul?  Recite your favorite scripture verse?  Maybe you would just repeat the words of this Psalm, “Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil for you are with me;”

 There was no other road to travel. No magical escape like using your communication device and asking Scotty to transport you back to the Starship Enterprise. The only way forward in this life is through the valley of sin and death.  We all must make this journey through the valley at some point in our lives.  When that day comes how will you navigate your way through the valley? Where will you find the comfort?  What will give you the necessary strength to endure? What gives us comfort is the same thing comforted psalmist.   The psalmist knew and Christians today know that our journey does not end there in the valley of death.  It is a passageway to the place Jesus prepared for us with His very own hands. Here what our Savior said in John 10: “All who came before me are thieves and robbers, but the sheep did not listen to them. I am the door. If anyone enters by me, he will be saved and will go in and out and find pasture.”  John 10:8–9.

 Even though we have this promise, we still must deal with the fear the valley can generate. Fear of death cripples us on this journey of life.   Take comfort in this the valley cannot destroy us.

As Paul reminds us in 1 Corinthians 15: “The last enemy to be destroyed is death. For “God has put all things in subjection under his feet.”

Behold! I tell you a mystery. We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed. For this perishable body must put on the imperishable, and this mortal body must put on immortality. When the perishable puts on the imperishable, and the mortal puts on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying that is written: 

“Death is swallowed up in victory.” 

“O death, where is your victory? 

O death, where is your sting?” 

The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

 Like Linus, I need to find that security, but If my deepest sense of security is in the efficiency man made promises of protection then when those things stumble, my fears can quickly engulf my joy. But if the Lord is my good shepherd, I can stand firm in the midst of the valley of the shadow of death because I know the shepherd will lead me through the valley.  The shepherd’s promise is all the security I need.  Jesus’ said, “I am the good shepherd. I know my own, and my own know me, just as the Father knows me, and I know the Father, and I lay down my life for the sheep. John 10:14–15

[1] [Philadelphia: Fortress, 1943]). Green, M. P. (Ed.). (1989). Illustrations for Biblical Preaching: Over 1500 sermon illustrations arranged by topic and indexed exhaustively (Revised edition of: The expositor’s illustration file). Grand Rapids: Baker Book House.

[2]  Tan, P. L. (1996). Encyclopedia of 7700 Illustrations: Signs of the Times (p. 1192). Garland, TX: Bible Communications, Inc.

Other posts on Psalm 23.

https://revheadpin.org/2017/05/18/do-you-know-any-shepherdshttps://revheadpin.org/2017/05/25/still-waters-runs-deep//https://revheadpin.org/2017/05/31/are-the-needs-of-the-one-greater-than-the-needs-of-the-many

Devotional Message, Psalm 23, Transitions

Are the Needs of the One Greater Than the Needs of the Many?

lightstock_432396_download_medium_byrene_haney_

 

“He brings me back.” Psalm 23:3

 The Camden, Maine Herald ran two photos on the same page: one of Camden’s board of selectmen and town manager; the other of a flock of sheep. Unintentionally the captions were reversed. Under the picture of the sheep the caption identified them, left to right, as town officials; the one under the photo of the city fathers grouped around a table read, “The Sheep Fold—naive and vulnerable, they huddle for security against the uncertainties of the outside world.” —Down-East[1]

Shepherds in the Holy Land, when asked to describe how sheep operate, have said that once a sheep knows that it is lost, it tries to hide under a bush or rock and begins quivering and bleating. The shepherd must locate it quickly lest it is heard and killed by a wild animal.

The psalmist, King David, provides some insight here to one of Jesus’ most popular yet misunderstood parables.  The parable is of the lost sheep.  It will add to our study of the Good Shepherd.  One thing about the parable that is often most misunderstood is, why would the shepherd leave the 99 to go after the one?  Isn’t bad stewardship?  Do we just count that as collateral damage?  If you struggle with this logic, you are thinking like a human and not like the divine.

The Background of the Text

Jesus is addressing this set of three parables to the self-righteous Pharisees, who believe they are so right with the Ancient of Days that they have no need for a savior.

Now the tax collectors and sinners were all drawing near to hear him. And the Pharisees and the scribes grumbled, saying, “This man receives sinners and eats with them.”

So, he told them this parable: “What man of you, having a hundred sheep, if he has lost one of them, does not leave the ninety-nine in the open country, and go after the one that is lost until he finds it? And when he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders, rejoicing. And when he comes home, he calls together his friends and his neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep that was lost.’ Just so, I tell you, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance. 1

Why Does the One Matter?

Here is where the next and most important lesson about sheep comes in to explain Jesus’ odd mathematical calculations.  Once a sheep is lost it becomes so traumatized that it is unable to walk and must be carried back to the flock or the village. Unaided, the lost sheep cannot find its way home and will most certainly become the victim of a predator.   That is the same fact that awaits the sinner who is lost and outside God’s sheepfold.  He/she cries out to be found.  The sheep may not even realize it is crying out, but the Good Shepherd hears that plea for help.  He sees it in the choices the sheep is making.  The shepherd hears it in the prayers of desperation that are prayed in their hour of deepest need.  And just like actual sheep, the lost soul’s only hope is the Good Shepherd who will come after us and hopefully find us, pick us up and carry us back to safety.  There are two critical actions the shepherd must take.

The shepherd must come after the lost sheep, which in itself is a costly endeavor for the Good Shepherd to come rescue it.  The Good Shepherd has to lay down His life on Calvary’s cross and then three days later pick up that life again.  He does this because a price must be paid by the shepherd to restore the lost sheep to the flock.  That is why when any lost sheep is restored there is rejoicing in heaven, because the cost for each sheep is precious.  God desires all lost sheep be restored.  That is just how valuable the sheep are to the Good Shepherd.  Now you see why Jesus will drop everything to go after the one.  The one matters to God.

[1] Tan, P. L. (1996). Encyclopedia of 7700 Illustrations: Signs of the Times (pp. 1533–1534). Garland, TX: Bible Communications, Inc.

 

Other posts on Psalm 23.

https://revheadpin.org/2017/05/18/do-you-know-any-shepherds

https://revheadpin.org/2017/05/25/still-waters-runs-deep/

https://revheadpin.org/2017/06/07/how-to-navigate-the-valley-of-death

 

Devotional Message, Psalm 23

Still, Waters Run Deep!

SONY DSC

He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters.

3He restores my soul. Psalm 23:2-3

 The Shepherd Provides

The early Native Americans had a unique practice of training young braves. On the night of a boy’s thirteenth birthday, after learning hunting, scouting, and fishing skills, he was put to one final test. He was placed in a dense forest to spend the entire night alone. Until then, he had never been away from the security of the family and the tribe. But on this night, he was blindfolded and taken several miles away. When he took off the blindfold, he was in the middle of thick woods, and he was terrified! Every time a twig snapped, he visualized a wild animal ready to pounce. After what seemed like an eternity, dawn broke, and the first rays of sunlight entered the interior of the forest. Looking around, the boy saw flowers, trees, and the outline of the path. Then, to his utter astonishment, he beheld the figure of a man standing just a few feet away, armed with a bow and arrow. It was his father. He had been there all night long.  -Our Daily Bread.

Stop and ponder that picture for a moment.  We go through life so often feeling terrified of all things happening around us. Like the blindfolded young braves, we attempt to man up and get through life all alone not knowing or understanding that we are never alone.  The Good Shepherd is there all the time never more than a few feet away, saying it is ok.  It is safe.   As we continue to slow walk our way through Psalm 23, there are just two imagines to meditate on here.

He settles me down in green pastures.

Sheep are skittish creatures and with good reason.  They have no weapons with which to defend themselves.  So, a sheep will not simply plop down for a nap unless the conditions are ideal. No one can make a lamb lie down. And only very young sheep can lie down and get up without assistance.  Sheep will only lie down when: 1) they have had plenty to eat, 2) have quenched their thirst, and 3) they are not threatened by any wild animal or disturbed by biting insects.  Jesus, the Good Shepherd, says you can have that feeling of complete protection and provision.  I will take care of all your needs so that you can rest secure in the bosom of your Savior.

He leads me beside still waters.

Sheep are afraid to drink water if it is moving.  So, to accommodate the sheep the shepherd must plan his entire day around the availability of water in the middle of the day.  Sheep remind me a lot of people.  We need to be pampered and cared for; we tend to be easily disturbed by the things around us beyond our control.  In spite of how difficult we can be to care for and even love, Jesus the Good Shepherd, knowing all of this about us still provides “still water” no matter the cost. And the cost to the Good Shepherd was His life.  He still leads me.  He still loves me.  His still waters truly run deep.

Other posts in this series:
https://revheadpin.org/2017/05/18/do-you-know-any-shepherds/

https://revheadpin.org/2017/05/31/are-the-needs-of-the-one-greater-than-the-needs-of-the-many

https://revheadpin.org/2017/06/07/how-to-navigate-the-valley-of-death

Devotional Message, Psalm 23

Do You Know Any Shepherds?

 lightstock_321046_download_medium_byrene_haney_

“I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.” John 10:11

 Most of us are not familiar with shepherds.  I bet we would have a hard time naming three off the top of your head.  Just to test this theory name three now, and Jesus does not count (his profession was a carpenter).

To help us better define what a shepherd is we will use as our primary text Psalm 23 written by a famous shepherd, David. We hear the scriptures describe the Lord as a shepherd, and Jesus as the shepherd of the sheep, but we don’t resonate with that. However, Jesus provides some context for his definition of the role the Good Shepherd plays in the life of his flock of believers.  The Shepherd heals and restores the broken.  You see that demonstrated in John 9 when Jesus heals the man born blind.  Jesus also heals the sick, brings back the lost and provides for the needs of the sheep, i.e. the feeding of the 4,000 and 5,000.

Over the next several weeks we will look at a few aspects of how King David defines the Good Shepherd.  I think it will help you better understand Jesus’ identification of being the Good Shepherd.

The Lord is my shepherd; Psalm 23:1a

 The shepherd is the only real line of defense the sheep have.  Sheep are like babies.  They are entirely dependent on the goodness and care of the shepherd.  Jesus points to this in John 10, 11 I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. 12 He who is a hired hand and not a shepherd, who does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and flees, and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. 13 He flees because he is a hired hand and cares nothing for the sheep.” The sheep have no way to protect themselves when the wolf comes.  If the one protecting the sheep abandons them, they are toast.  All the sheep can do is run.

 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.” John 10:11

 

Most of us are not familiar with shepherds.  I bet we would have a hard time naming three off the top of your head.  Just to test this theory name three now, and Jesus does not count (his profession was a carpenter).

To help us better define what a shepherd is we will use as our primary text Psalm 23 written by a famous shepherd, David. We hear the scriptures describe the Lord as a shepherd, and Jesus as the shepherd of the sheep, but we don’t resonate with that. However, Jesus provides some context for his definition of the role the Good Shepherd plays in the life of his flock of believers.  The Shepherd heals and restores the broken.  You see that demonstrated in John 9 when Jesus heals the man born blind.  Jesus also heals the sick, brings back the lost and provides for the needs of the sheep, i.e. the feeding of the 4,000 and 5,000.

Over the next several weeks we will look at a few aspects of how King David defines the Good Shepherd.  I think it will help you better understand Jesus’ identification of being the Good Shepherd.

The Lord is my shepherd;

 

The shepherd is the only real line of defense the sheep have.  Sheep are like babies.  They are entirely dependent on the goodness and care of the shepherd.  Jesus points to this in John 10, 11 I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. 12 He who is a hired hand and not a shepherd, who does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and flees, and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. 13 He flees because he is a hired hand and cares nothing for the sheep.” The sheep have no way to protect themselves when the wolf comes.  If the one protecting the sheep abandons them, they are toast.  All the sheep can do is run.  The Good Shepherd provides protection for the sheep in the midst of all dangers, with Jesus in charge there is no need for any other security.

 

I shall not want.

 

Madonna, the singer not the Mother of our Lord, once had a song called, “Living in a Material World.”  And that title is so telling.  We do live in a very materialistic society.  To counter that Jesus makes a bold claim, “I am the Good Shepherd, I care for the sheep.” Translation “You shall not want.” Notice Jesus did not say you shall not desire.  Jesus never promises to satisfy all my desires, and that is a good thing.  I have lots of desires.  I love shoes.  That drives my wife crazy.  I have shoes for every mood I am in. Lately, I have given away most of them some only worn three or four times.

Best Buy is always a bad idea for me, because I love technology.  I saw this brand-new television that curves and is in 3D with surround sound speakers so you can feel like you are in the movie theater. And on top of it when you watch sports on it you can see the sweat drop off the players.  Do I desire that? You bet, does Jesus promise me I will get that, No!  Jesus says you shall not want, in other words, the Good Shepherd promises to provide me with the basics in life, food, drink, tranquility, to rescue me when I am lost, give me freedom from fear and death.  Jesus never promises to grant all my desires, if he did I would need a bigger barn to store all those things.  Jesus gives me what I need so that I am not in want.  He knows me.  He understands my situation. I can put my trust in him for the things I need today.  Jesus reminds us that in Matthew 6, “Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life?”

 

Come back next Thursday as we continue our walk through Psalm 23.

 

I shall not want. Psalm 23:1b

 Madonna, the singer not the Mother of our Lord, once had a song called, “Living in a Material World.”  And that title is so telling.  We do live in a very materialistic society.  To counter that Jesus makes a bold claim, “I am the Good Shepherd, I care for the sheep.” Translation “You shall not want.” Notice Jesus did not say you shall not desire.  Jesus never promises to satisfy all my desires, and that is a good thing.  I have lots of desires.  I love shoes.  That drives my wife crazy.  I have shoes for every mood I am in. Lately, I have given away most of them some only worn three or four times.

Best Buy is always a bad idea for me because I love technology.  I saw this brand-new television that curves and is in 3D with surround sound speakers so you can feel like you are in the movie theater. And on top of it when you watch sports on you can see the sweat drop off the players.  Do I desire that? You bet, does Jesus promise me I will get that, No!  Jesus says you shall not want, in other words, the Good Shepherd promises to provide me with the basics in life, food, drink, tranquility, to rescue me when I am lost, give me freedom from fear and death.  Jesus never promises to grant all my desires, if he did I would need a bigger barn to store all those things.  Jesus gives me what I need so that I am not in want.  He knows me.  He understands my situation. I can put my trust in him for the things I need today.  Jesus reminds us that in Matthew 6, “Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life?”

 

Read more as we continue our walk through Psalm 23.
https://revheadpin.org/2017/05/25/still-waters-runs-deep

https://revheadpin.org/2017/05/31/are-the-needs-of-the-one-greater-than-the-needs-of-the-many

https://revheadpin.org/2017/06/07/how-to-navigate-the-valley-of-death